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Production 2 Final Film Project Combines Forces of Entire Class

April 17, 2017 General, News Comments Off on Production 2 Final Film Project Combines Forces of Entire Class

by Phil Wilson, Program Director and Lead Film Faculty. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)

 

Rule: teaching a group of creative young people requires you yourself to be… well, creative.

One of the things I love about teaching is that it continually forces you to dream, invent, and design new methods and approaches for students to engage with their crafts. The students in this semester’s Production 2 course have lit frame recreations, produced a foley pit audio exercise, and edited a music video (shot by Music-Video-Director-in-Residence Jeremy Tremp). The bar has been set very high for all three projects, so for the class’s final project, I wanted us to do something big.

In the previous production classes I have taught, I have had the students write and shoot independent 2-minute projects called “scene studies.” These projects are shot by student crews within one class period, and they are often comedic, light-hearted, and a lot of fun to shoot. These scene studies are isolated pieces with no real connection to each other. So for this final project, I wanted to challenge the students to produce something that could be shot by multiple directors, with different student crews, and over many class periods, and still be connected by the characters and plot. So what did we come up with?

“Pitch Day” tells the story of two writers who have to formulate an amazing “calling card” scene for a hotshot student director headed for Hollywood. We start with a ‘writer’s room’ scenario where the characters sit around and say ‘what if?’ and pitch ideas. Those ideas are then, to use a film term, “Cut To:” as live action scenes. The scenes interact in a playful way…if a writer changes the location, our characters are suddenly shown in that new location. Near the end of the film, the team finally settles on a scene that they like…but Gandalf the intern spills coffee on all of the scripts. (Whoops). When he dries them with his magic, he inadvertently blends all of the scenes together into one final scene. The final scene is (hopefully) about as screwball as you can get, as it incorporates elements from past pitches such as low-budget Narnia, espionage, and terribly disjointed dialogue. Will the scene be a success? Will the actors hate it? Will our director use it to land his Hollywood dream job? You’ll have to keep an eye on our YouTube page to find out!

A number of writers have contributed to improving this project, including Maggie Nelson, Lisette Perez, Dexter Van Horn, Joe Stone, and our own Cinema Studies Professor Jeannie Berg.

Our film is Breakfast Club meets Groundhog Day meets Community. And hopefully, like many of our efforts here at HUAZ, sets a fine precedent for incoming Production 2 classes that embodies the “professional yet fun” approach we all have come to know and enjoy from our HU Pioneers.

 

(Pictured: Phil Wilson’s Production 2 class filming a portion of their multi-scene short film in the student lounge.)

Social Media Madness at HUAZ!

April 17, 2017 General, Events Comments Off on Social Media Madness at HUAZ!

by Jamie SanFilippo, Coordinator of Student Services. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)

 

After March Madness left Phoenix, HUAZ got into Social Media Madness! We made a goal with our students to boost our outreach efforts and raise more awareness across all social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Throughout the month of April, we have been posting special content on all platforms to encourage people to #SupportHUAZ. We’ve made sure to include incentives on both ends to increase our current followers! Every week we’ve had external contests, allowing current and new followers the opportunity to win gift cards! On the internal side of things, our students have been incentivized to share our content to family and friends for an opportunity to win HUAZ Swag. We started our contest around 500 followers for all social media platforms. Our goal is to double that, and you can help!

If you aren’t already, we encourage you to follow us on Facebook: @HuntingtonUArizona, Instagram: @HuntingtonUArizona, and Twitter: @HuntingtonU_AZ. We thank you in advance for the support you’ve provided for HUAZ!

La La Land: A Study on Perseverance and Individuality

April 17, 2017 Film Reviews Comments Off on La La Land: A Study on Perseverance and Individuality

by Phil Wilson, Program Director and Lead Film Faculty. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)

 

La La Land is an invigorating and romantic love letter to Hollywood. Its casts’ performances are natural and relatable, and the film features one of the most memorable opening sequences of any film ever. It is a triumph, a colorful joy to witness, and is, in the opinion of this reviewer, an instant, genre-redefining classic.

The last great modern musical I saw was Baz Luhrman’s Moulin Rouge. After that film was released, droves of choir and theatre kids at my high school were singing songs and re-enacting scenes from that film. Now, I am sure there are a number of scenes from La La Land being re-enacted in the living rooms and high school stages everywhere by young would-be performers and, in the words of one of the film’s signature songs, “the dreamers.”

The thesis of La La Land is hard to define. On one hand, it is a study on perseverance, as it profiles two characters in LA who are pursing their dreams into their late 20s. On the other hand, it is about being true to yourself and using your unique qualities to carve your own path. The character’s journeys both remind me of the filmmakers who distribute on YouTube or the bands who self-release their own albums, forgoing the typical studio “systems.” Emma Stone’s character Mia wants to be a famous actress, while Ryan Gosling’s character Sebastian wants to own his own Jazz club. Both characters pursue their goals in different ways and struggle with notions of ‘selling out’ and forgoing their dreams for what is stable.

This aspect of the film struck a chord with me, as I’m sure it did with many aspiring artists, about the balance between being true to yourself as an artist and being labeled as a ‘corporate sell out.’ But one aspect of the film that didn’t appeal to me was how it defined “success.” Being able to flex my God-given creative muscles and create is, yes, such an amazing gift and opportunity; but serving my wife and being a great father is so much more meaningful to me. That is my success, regardless of what I have contributed to the world creatively. If, at the end of my days, I’ve left behind caring and compassionate people who love God and others, and I haven’t directed five features, my life has still been a success.

The main characters both encourage each other to not give up in the face of constant rejection. Near the end of the film, Emma Stone’s character poignantly expresses the frustation felt by all undiscovered actors…“I can’t do this anymore…five years of going from audition to audition…they laugh at me while I’m crying, order a sandwich in the middle of my scene, and walk out to see a room full of girls that look just like me only prettier. I’m done.”

La La Land is an homage to those brave souls who go to Hollywood to pursue their dreams, and the film offers us that very rare point of view of what two optimistic idealists must do to maintain and survive the rigors of LA.

Schoolwide Events Enjoyed Amongst Students

April 17, 2017 General, Events Comments Off on Schoolwide Events Enjoyed Amongst Students

by Jamie SanFilippo, Coordinator of Student Services. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)

 

What a fun-filled month we’ve had at Huntington so far! It has been jam-packed with activities for our students, giving them an opportunity to hang out outside of the classroom.

The first week, our ladies’ small group reviewed their Gallup Strength Finders Assessment with Strength Finders coach Carole Bongard. It was a fun night of fellowship that gave the ladies more insight into what their strengths are, how their strengths work together, and ways to apply them. The following week, the ladies’ small group went to ‘As you Wish Pottery’ and painted some pretty rad pieces! You could say we laughed all night and closed the place down.

The third week consisted of an Easter Egg Hunt and guys small group!

The Easter Egg Hunt we had at HUAZ was a rendition of the main campus, which they hosted last week. We added a twist to ours by hiding 170 eggs throughout our 30,000 sq. ft. building. The eligible prizes were $25 gift cards to Target, AMC, and Chipotle; $5 gift cards to Starbucks, In-N-Out, Chik-Fil-A, and Culvers; and quarters!

The rules were that students couldn’t turn in more than 3 eggs at a time and the twist was that some of the eggs were confetti eggs! If a student turned in an egg that had a confetti egg number, they had to pick a confetti egg and see what was in store next. There were Whammy eggs that meant a student lost an egg prize, Bomb eggs that meant they could steal from another opponent, Hint eggs that gave them a clue to a camo or golden egg, one Golden egg that allowed them to collected all Whammy egg prizes, and safe eggs. Overall everyone had a blast! It took two and a half hours for everyone to find all of the eggs and even so, seven are still hidden somewhere in the building. Our big prize winners for the night were Jayson who found the first Gold egg, Patricia, and the Josiah, Alex duo who found the last!

The next night, the guys’ small group ate dinner at Chipotle (one of their favorites) and ended the night at Castles-N-Coasters playing mini golf! They broke up into groups and had fun making their way from hole 1 to 18. The fellows did a great job achieving some holes in one and happy to report that no one landed in the water! The night concluded with Eric winning the event with a score of 47 and lots of guys just within reach.

We look forward to our next round of activities in May!

 

(Pictured: Alex Palacios, Olivya Bryant, and Maggie Nelson enjoying the ladies’ small group pottery painting event at As You Wish Pottery on April 3.)

Peoria Sports Complex Offers Exciting Internships to Huntington Students

March 27, 2017 General Comments Off on Peoria Sports Complex Offers Exciting Internships to Huntington Students

by Matthew Torres-Gomez, film and broadcast student. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)

 

When I first started my journey at Huntington, there was a lot to love about the Digital Media Arts program that factored into my decision to transfer there…none probably bigger than the opportunity to sharpen my professional skills and build my resume by applying for the many internships the school connects you with. But to already have an internship right out of my first semester? It’s just unheard of!

My internship at the Peoria Sports Complex has been an exhilarating first step to getting my foot in the door in the broadcast/sports industry as a Broadcast Media major. I’m a production room assistant, helping organize and operate the inside-the-ballpark broadcast. I have received the privilege of operating the sound board (Yamaha TF1) video board (TriCaster 460) and replay (3Play 425) to enhance the fan experience during Mariners and Padres spring training games.

On the sound board, I control the audio levels of the PA announcer, national anthem singer, advertisement and various videos shown on the big screen, as well as the music that is played…which is nice because you can pick any music you want to play via Sound Director when working the sound board! As the video board/replay operator, I get to replay highlight-worthy plays on the big screen as well as cut together a creative highlight reel of the game that I get to show in the 9th inning.

The production room is fast paced. You must always stay on your toes and watch what you are doing because the pressure is on you to get that fan experience right. But once you get the hang of the routine it’s an exciting environment filled with great people, the opportunity to be creative with the media at your disposal, and spring training baseball!

Digital Painting Class Caricaturizes Huntington Crew

March 27, 2017 Student Exhibit Comments Off on Digital Painting Class Caricaturizes Huntington Crew

by Sarah Wickenhauser, graphic design student. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)

 

For the eight weeks since the spring 2017 semester started, Huntington University Arizona’s graphic design students have been studying a variety of subjects, from 3D sculpture to vector art to photo compositing…and in Daniel Sidler’s Digital Drawing & Painting class, the students have been learning how to design dynamic, engaging characters, either from scratch or from existing people!

One project assigned to the class was to design caricatures of the core HUAZ staff (Jeff Berggren, Jamie SanFilippo, Phil Wilson, and Eric Luce) and paint them in Photoshop.

Sarah Wickenhauser’s interpretation of the project (first) depicts the crew in a cartoony style, while Josiah Duka’s (third) is a blend of stylized and realistic. Animation enthusiast Richard Sawyer’s piece (middle) takes inspiration from classic and modern Disney character design styles.

 

HUAZ Helps Host Special Visual Effects Symposium

March 27, 2017 Events, News Comments Off on HUAZ Helps Host Special Visual Effects Symposium

by Jeff Berggren, HU Director of Arizona Operations. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)

 

What could be better than appreciating the details of the excellent visual effects in movies such as Night at the Museum, Captain America, The Avenger films, The Great Wall, and Harry Potter? How about the opportunity to directly interact with the creators of some of the visual effects? That is the quick summary of what a contingent of HU AZ students did on Saturday the 18th of March.

The Huntington students joined other area college students, high school students from the Peoria Student Broadcasting Network (PSBN), media teachers and professors along with media industry professional for a special Visual Effects Symposium courtesy of Ignyted Artists and Bucci Entertainment Group. Guest speakers for the morning general session included Matthew Dean Russell (Producer, Director, and Screen Writer at BAKEDFX Studies in Los Angeles) and Mark Mathis (Idependant Feature Film Producer and Line Producer).

After the morning presentation at Harkins Theater, it was Huntington’s opportunity to host all attendees including teachers and students at our building for lunch. HU students had the opportunity to interact with media professionals from around the valley who came to the event. But the highlight of the day for many if not all HU students in attendance occurred after lunch when Matt Hartle (VFX & Motion Graphics Director of BAKEDFX Studios) let a special session in the HU Screening Room direct from his studio in Montana.

Hartle appeared via video link and then shared his computer desktop with the audience which consisted primarily of HU students and PSBN students. Hartle showed the details of some of his digital effects work from movies like Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them as well as a story board animation he is currently constructing for the new multi-million dollar Paramount Animation Studios logo. That was followed by a lengthy Q & A session with the students that resulted in Hartle pulling up prior projects from his extensive list of design folders on his computer much to the appreciation of the audience.

When asked about the quality of the day afterwards HU students where quite positive on the experience. Rich Sawyers, currently a graphic design major but moving to animation, thought Hartle’s presentation was very interesting and appreciated his detailed answers to the student questions regarding design process and software. Josiah Hunt, a film production major, summed up the symposium day in three concise words: “It was dope!” Well said, Mr. Hunt.

Logan: A Thought-Provoking, Conflicting Film Experience

March 27, 2017 Film Reviews Comments Off on Logan: A Thought-Provoking, Conflicting Film Experience

by Sarah Wickenhauser, The Filmstrip editor and graphic design student. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)

 

Because of the explosion of popularity superhero films have seen in popular culture, it has become increasingly common for superhero films to “break the boundaries” of their genre in an attempt to stay fresh and relevant. “Deadpool” (2016) was an irreverent comedy; “Doctor Strange” (2016) was a mystical fantasy adventure; “Guardians of the Galaxy” (2014) was a sci-fi space story; so what is “Logan”, 2017’s superhero film from Marvel and 20th Century Fox?

Since “Logan” marks the end of Hugh Jackman’s contract for his recurring role as the character Logan/Wolverine, and this film is his character’s farewell to the franchise, the plot and tone of the story definitely reflects this fact. The film is set in the future (2029) and depicts Logan as aged, haggard, and continually weakening. All the other mutants have been killed except for Caliban (played by Stephen Merchant) and Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart), who live in hiding in an abandoned smelting plant in Mexico. Logan spends his days caring for Xavier, who is suffering from an unspecified neurodegenerative disease that causes him to have dangerous telepathic seizures. While smuggling drugs to help keep Xavier’s seizures under control, Logan meets a woman who begs him to escort her and a young girl named Laura to a safe haven in North Dakota. Logan at first refuses; but when the woman is murdered by goons for the biotechnology corporation Transigen, and the girl Laura is revealed to be a mutant with the same powers as the Wolverine, Logan and Xavier begin their journey with Laura to the mutant safe haven in North Dakota.

The film earns its R rating from being filled with violence and language, but between the hard-core action scenes is the tender story of a weary old man who discovers one last thing to protect and live for: his new progeny Laura. The entire story is tinged with a bittersweet tone of sentiment, especially for fans of the X-Men series and Hugh Jackman’s character Wolverine. The film’s juxtaposition of violence and tenderness impressed many critics; one reviewer, Chris Nashawaty of Entertainment Weekly, said the film was “both the most violent film in the series and the most sentimental one; When it’s not showering you in blood, it’s trying to make you spill tears.”

As a casual fan of the X-Men series and superhero movies in general, I have mixed feelings about this film. Though I agree with the majority of the positive critical consensus, I feel like the film was missing the element that made superhero films popular in the first place: the fact that the world of superhero stories didn’t have to be dark, grim, and realistic. I know realism has a place in cinema, but the world is already dark enough in reality without the world of entertainment having to be dark as well. The tone in “Logan” wasn’t entirely devoid of hope, but I’m just not a fan of stories that are so depressing that they make you walk out of the theater feeling empty and despondent.

Of course, the film’s R-rated content makes the movie confusing as well, because in my mind, the kind of people who enjoy sitting through hours of gore and f-words are not same as the kind of people who enjoy a sentimental, tear-jerker story about family, old age, and death. Especially since the movie is apparently attempting to also appeal to the Deadpool crowd, since a dark-humored Deadpool short film plays before Logan starts.

In short, “Logan” is a thought-provoking film with fascinatingly conflicting elements…but I can only recommend it to viewers who are already used to R-rated content, because it is not exactly wholesome entertainment.

Podcasting Class Provides Opportunities for Enthusiastic Students

March 27, 2017 General Comments Off on Podcasting Class Provides Opportunities for Enthusiastic Students

by Rachel Berggren, broadcast student. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)

 

As daughter of Jeff Berggren, Director of Arizona Operations for Huntington University, my word may not be very believable when I praise HU. However, my extraordinary perspective does lend itself to an interesting view of the classes here on campus. After seeing this building renovated from the ground up, I was accepted into Huntington’s early entry program. This program grants high school students the opportunity to partake in college-level classes as well as be treated as just another college participant. Currently, I am taking a Podcasting course, which is part of the greater Broadcasting major, though any student is permitted to take it.

My professor is NPR professional Jimmy Jenkins, who is a team member of the National Public Radio station here in Arizona. His class is hosted each Tuesday evening at 7pm, which is partially why I chose the class; it’s a little difficult to arrive at a daytime class when I have high school to attend. I have only four other classmates, not including myself and Professor Jenkins, making for a very intimate and personal classroom experience. This small community is ideal for sharing work, accommodating the students’ busy lives with schedule changes, and adjusting the syllabus to meet the requirements of individuals.

Specific course projects tend to be linked through a gradually increasing difficulty curve, though it remains fair throughout. When class began in February, the assignments were mostly overviewed with copious examples before sending us to record our own based on loose templates. We created simple features, such as “News Voicers” and “Audio Postcards,” both of which contain basic concepts which appear regularly in radio broadcasting. As time went on, however, our assignments became more complex and specific, requiring us to pool our newfound knowledge to create specific features that focus on one of many popular news topics: entertainment, business, and sports, all of which include subtle structure changes in order to convey the feeling associated with the topic at hand. Our time to complete the assignment is then increased for these larger projects, and Professor Jenkins is very forgiving when it comes to technical difficulties, which he addresses and offers advice for after we present our pieces.

The final project for the class will be our own personal podcast of any form and variety we choose. Free reign is wide for this assignment, allowing us to use all previously gathered knowledge in a new way twisted creatively into whatever we want, which is the ultimate goal of any creativity-based course. Due to the nature of the project, nearly every one of my peers is going a separate direction, bred from the individuality among us five. Personally, I am planning on recording an unedited, raw and lengthy podcast that features new guests each week, while two others are coming together and doing an edited, fun-loving co-host show meant for any audience.

As audio-savvy creators, this class offers nothing less than exactly what any of us had hoped for from a Podcasting class.

Experimental Short Film Project Brings January Term Class Together

January 16, 2017 General, News Comments Off on Experimental Short Film Project Brings January Term Class Together

by Phil Wilson, Program Director and Lead Film Faculty. (Published in The Filmstrip, January 2017 edition.)

A group of students tote cameras and film gear along a hillside as the sun approaches golden hour. They frame up their actor, who is contemplative, thoughtful, and enamored with the beauty that surrounds them. Beads of sweat form on the operator’s face as he lines up the shot. Sun streaks boldly through the folded hands of the talent, who has ascended a rock. She is now in prayer. Everyone is quiet, tired from the hike, watching the scene unfold. After a moment, the director of photography says, “OK, I think we got it.” The crew packs up and moves on.

A portrait of this year’s January Term (J-Term) project, called: “Hymn of St Francis.”

Project synopsis: “Hymn of St Francis” is an experimental short film that tells three overlapping stories through stunning visuals and vivid orchestral music.

Creative approach: while three college students read excerpts from their prayer journals to their small group leader around a campfire, snapshots of their lives are shown through a series of vignettes captured via quiet observational footage, majestic time-lapse shots, and aerial drone coverage. The film concludes with the leader reading the ‘peace’ prayer from St. Francis of Assisi.

Our J-Term students have been divided into three teams of five to tackle their assigned portion of the project. Actors have been cast from within the groups and have been charged with the task of writing the prayers. Directors and Directors of Photography have been conceptualizing and shot-listing while Producers have been lining up locations, props, and all other logistics.

Students have been out shooting day and night with drones, dollies, gimbals, low-light and 4.6K cinema cameras. They have been logging hundreds of miles, travelling to the the Imperial Sand Dunes, the San Tan and White Tank Mountains, Sedona, Flagstaff, and the Tonto National Forest. As their efforts will be collected and formed into the final piece in the coming weeks, I can’t help but be grateful for how they’ve engaged with reckless abandon on this project, which has shaped up to be an enlightening, bond-forming, cinematic adventure for all!

 

(Pictured: A stunning vista captured by one of the J-Term teams during their trip to Devil’s Bridge, Sedona.)

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Film Reviews

La La Land: A Study on Perseverance and Individuality

17 Apr 2017

by Phil Wilson, Program Director and Lead Film Faculty. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)   La La Land is an invigorating and romantic love letter to Hollywood. Its casts’ performances are natural and relatable, and the film features one of the most memorable opening sequences of any film …

Logan: A Thought-Provoking, Conflicting Film Experience

27 Mar 2017

by Sarah Wickenhauser, The Filmstrip editor and graphic design student. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)   Because of the explosion of popularity superhero films have seen in popular culture, it has become increasingly common for superhero films to “break the boundaries” of their genre in an attempt to …

Marvel Studios Takes a Trip Into the World of Magic in Doctor Strange

1 Dec 2016

by Sarah Wickenhauser, graphic design student. (Published in The Filmstrip, December 2016 edition.)   Since Marvel Studios has made some of the highest-grossing movies in recent history, changing the formula that made them a success is a risky move. Did it pay off in this strange new addition to their …

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: A Fan’s Perspective

1 Dec 2016

by Patricia Santiago, film student. (Published in The Filmstrip, December 2016 edition.)   “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” is a film about magic zoologist, Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne), who finds himself in New York’s secret community of witches and wizards in 1962. He befriends a muggle (non-magical person) …

Jack Reacher: Never Go Back

2 Nov 2016

by Dexter Van Horn, film student. (Published in The Filmstrip, November 2016 edition.)   Jack Reacher: Never Go Back stars Tom Cruise in his second time as the titular character, as well as Cobie Smulders as Major Susan Turner (love interest?) and Danika Yarosh as Samantha (his daughter??). In a …

Student Exhibit

Digital Painting Class Caricaturizes Huntington Crew

27 Mar 2017

by Sarah Wickenhauser, graphic design student. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)   For the eight weeks since the spring 2017 semester started, Huntington University Arizona’s graphic design students have been studying a variety of subjects, from 3D sculpture to vector art to photo compositing…and in Daniel Sidler’s Digital …

Latest Graphic Design Student Projects Strike an Emotional Chord

6 Oct 2016 | Posted By: Sarah Wickenhauser

Since starting class the end of August, Professor Daniel Sidler’s graphic design students have been applying themselves to learning how to communicate clear messages with their art. Their latest project, to express an emotion in a piece of art, was evidence of what they have learned so far this semester! …

General

Production 2 Final Film Project Combines Forces of Entire Class

17 Apr 2017

by Phil Wilson, Program Director and Lead Film Faculty. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)   Rule: teaching a group of creative young people requires you yourself to be… well, creative. One of the things I love about teaching is that it continually forces you to dream, invent, and design …

Social Media Madness at HUAZ!

17 Apr 2017

by Jamie SanFilippo, Coordinator of Student Services. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)   After March Madness left Phoenix, HUAZ got into Social Media Madness! We made a goal with our students to boost our outreach efforts and raise more awareness across all social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, and …

Schoolwide Events Enjoyed Amongst Students

17 Apr 2017

by Jamie SanFilippo, Coordinator of Student Services. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)   What a fun-filled month we’ve had at Huntington so far! It has been jam-packed with activities for our students, giving them an opportunity to hang out outside of the classroom. The first week, our ladies’ …

News

Production 2 Final Film Project Combines Forces of Entire Class

17 Apr 2017

by Phil Wilson, Program Director and Lead Film Faculty. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)   Rule: teaching a group of creative young people requires you yourself to be… well, creative. One of the things I love about teaching is that it continually forces you to dream, invent, and design …

HUAZ Helps Host Special Visual Effects Symposium

27 Mar 2017

by Jeff Berggren, HU Director of Arizona Operations. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)   What could be better than appreciating the details of the excellent visual effects in movies such as Night at the Museum, Captain America, The Avenger films, The Great Wall, and Harry Potter? How about …

Experimental Short Film Project Brings January Term Class Together

16 Jan 2017

by Phil Wilson, Program Director and Lead Film Faculty. (Published in The Filmstrip, January 2017 edition.) A group of students tote cameras and film gear along a hillside as the sun approaches golden hour. They frame up their actor, who is contemplative, thoughtful, and enamored with the beauty that surrounds …

Events

Social Media Madness at HUAZ!

17 Apr 2017

by Jamie SanFilippo, Coordinator of Student Services. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)   After March Madness left Phoenix, HUAZ got into Social Media Madness! We made a goal with our students to boost our outreach efforts and raise more awareness across all social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, and …

Schoolwide Events Enjoyed Amongst Students

17 Apr 2017

by Jamie SanFilippo, Coordinator of Student Services. (Published in The Filmstrip, April 2017 edition.)   What a fun-filled month we’ve had at Huntington so far! It has been jam-packed with activities for our students, giving them an opportunity to hang out outside of the classroom. The first week, our ladies’ …

HUAZ Helps Host Special Visual Effects Symposium

27 Mar 2017

by Jeff Berggren, HU Director of Arizona Operations. (Published in The Filmstrip, March 2017 edition.)   What could be better than appreciating the details of the excellent visual effects in movies such as Night at the Museum, Captain America, The Avenger films, The Great Wall, and Harry Potter? How about …